Posts Tagged: music

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Action Speaks Louder Than Words, Chocolate Milk’s big hit. 1975.

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Clifton Chenier- “My Soul”. 1955. Etta James on backing vocals!

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Here’s Kid Ory’s version of Eh, La Bas. 1946.

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Corey Harris - “Eh La Bas”. 1999. I first heard his rendition of this traditional tune on the excellent  Greens from the Garden.

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And here’s the Tuxedo Jazz Band doing “Just a Closer Walk With Thee”, live in Germany, 1964.

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Ernie K. Doe. Here Come the Girls. 1970. Produced by Allen Toussaint, obvi.

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Professor Longhair - “Cry to Me”. From 1980’s Crawfish Fiesta. That’s Dr. John on guitar.

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Professor Longhair - Crawfish Fiesta. 1980. From the album of the same name.

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jscarlton:

Mahalia Jackson is the second greatest of New Orleans musicians, behind only Louis Armstrong. Because she sung in a niche genre, the Queen of Gospel has remained relatively unknown.

This version of Silent Night illustrates what a powerful voice Jackson had and reveals her great command and musicality. She almost plays with the melody, transforming a song that has become trite (although it probably wasn’t she recorded this) into something different, something special. It’s so, so good.

I guess the best thing I can say is that Mahalia Jackson’s singing is so good that it makes up for the cheesy arrangements that pollute her Christmas albums.

Source: jscarlton
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jscarlton:

Benny Grunch and the Bunch, the 12 Yats of Christmas

I could listen to unlimited numbers of (more or less) well-done novelty versions of the 12 days of Christmas. This one is, of course a favorite, as is the 12 Pains of Christmas and whatever you call this.

Benny Grunch and the Bunch are a novelty act that pops up around town every few years with songs like this one. Another of their hits is the subtle-but-true “There Ain’t No Place to Pee on Mardi Gras Day”.

This video is from some time in the 1990s, and is interesting because so many of the places in the video don’t exist anymore: K&B drug stores, A&G Cafeteria (which was gone before they filmed the video, notice the Picadilly), McKenzie’s bakery, the 17th Street Canal is still there, but now has tragic underpinnings, as does the lower 9th ward. Schwegmann’s was sold in 1996.

That’s fully half of the 12 Yats of Christmas that are gone or irrevocably changed, either due to economic insolvency or disaster. While I still enjoy the song as a celebration of the uniqueness of the city, there is now a sense of poignancy and loss, as I wonder about New Orleans in the future, and whether the unique institutions that make the city great will survive.

It’s enough to make a man drink a dix pack of Sixie.

Source: jscarlton